New Horizons for me at Dell

I am excited to announce I am joining Dell Healthcare and Life Sciences 

as their Chief Medical Officer. Dell has been ranked number one in Healthcare Provider Services for six consecutive years by Gartner and continue to expand their presence in healthcare space with an incredible range of solutions and services that are combined with extensive experience offerings of hardware and infrastructure.

This was such an exciting opportunity with a dynamic company with a focus on healthcare that is driven by a guiding principle from Michael Dell:

Technology has always been about enabling human potential

The opportunity to apply this principle with the assembled first class talented team that have a wide range of skills and deep industry knowledge is empowering and exciting. Healthcare is personal and struggling to deal with technology that has in many cases hindered the personal realtionship between the doctor and the patient. Clinicians want to focus on the patient and not the technology and while patients like technology to be used to improve the quality and safety of care while helping to reduce the costs they also want to doctor to pay attention to them not the device(s) as I have said on many occasions – here in this AMDIS presentation on documentation:
[slideshare id=24308856&doc=amdisdocumentationpanel-nickvanterheyden-130716141231-phpapp02]
and Healthcare Technology need to include Patients

When I looked at the breadth of what Dell already offers its customers, the range of amazing talent, and some of their innovation projects that included

  • An impressive healthcare cloud and a focus on Interoperability
  • Patient engagement, predictive analytics, population health management
  • Social Media and mobile solutions
  • Working on Genomics Cloud Storage and analysis that included the recent announcement of the Dell and Translational Genomics Research Institute that is supporting the fight against Pediatric Cancer and helping clinical researchers and doctors globally expand the reach and impact of the world’s first Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved personalized medicine trial for pediatric cancer.
  • This all felt like a perfect match and one that offered me personally an incredible opportunity to have a positive impact on healthcare delivery system here in the US but also around the world.

Amongst the many bonuses of this opportunity was my friend becoming a new work colleague – I am excited to be joining Mandi Bishop (@MandBPro) – social media guru, #HITChick and innovator in data management and analysis.

The big draw for me was that Dell already has a vast amount of products, solutions and data along with insights that they are already integrating across multiple platforms, facilities and technologies. I can’t wait to share more on some of the projects the Dell team are working on soon.

 

 

MasterChef in Healthcare: Integrating Social Media

Social Media is rapidly becoming an integral part of our lives. Despite the pervasive nature of the communication channel healthcare remains a technology laggard. This presentation from HIMSS15 Wednesday Apr 15) will offer insights to help understand why healthcare professionals should join the community, participate in the discussion and how can do so successfully.

gordon_ramsayNickasGordon

I presented this topic at HIMSS15 on Wednesday Apr 15 – you can find the listing here. As promised I am posting a summary of the points as well as a link to the Slideshare for that presentation

You can find the presentation on my slideshare (nvt) here

 

 

DontKNowWhichDoctor

Technology is all pervasive in our lives and Social media is everywhere – in fact in a recent survey of 3,000 people conducted in the US, UK and Germany to help counter the limited time with their physicians, patients are seeking information and embracing technology outside of the doctor’s office to come to appointments prepared. Approximately 80 percent of patients feel engaged in their own health:

  • 68 percent of patients bring a list of questions to each doctor’s consult;
  • 39 percent have checked WebMD or another online source in advance; and
  • 20 percent bring personal health data from outside monitors.

PatientsEnteringWithDigitalInformation

 

You can see some 87%o f US adults are online in this Pew internet research so if you are not on board you are missing a huge opportunity but more importantly your patients are forming an opinion about you before they meet you

 

PatientsFormedOpinion

 

 What is Social Media

  • It’s a conversation, not a lecture
  • It’s an extension of everyday interactionCollaboration
  • It’s group driven, not top-down
  • It’s messy, disorganized & hard to control
  • It’s a tool, not an end-point
  • But most of all…

 

 

If you have not already – go to twitter and sign up for an account

What to Tweet

  • What you have read that you want to share with others
  • When and where you are speaking
  • Something you post on your blog
  • A link to a Web site that you find interesting
  • Listen to conversations happening online using keywords (hashtags, lists and searches) – learn from your colleagues, friends and patients
  • Befriend people – and then earn their trust by solve problems, answering queries, helping and providing useful information
  • Share information, valuable content with them
  • Questions and Requests for information and help – crowdsourcing answers
  • At a minimum – Lurk, Listen and Learn

There are many HashTags to follow and starting by assign friends and colleagues what they follow is a a good start but then get involved – join an online chat and community and take a look at the listing of healthcare hash tags from symplur. Listed below are a few of the healthcare hash tags I follow:

#hcsm (h/c social media)
#HCLDR (healthcare leaders)
#HITsm (health IT social media)#MedEd (medical education)
#mHealth
#eolchat (end of life/elder chat)
#BCSM (breast-cancer social media)
#LCSM (lung-cancer social media)
#BTSM (brain tumor social media)
#S4PM (Society for participatory medicine)

But I received a aggregated list when I polled my followed that included all these:

Others

#QuantifiedSelf
#KareoChat
#HITChicks
#HIT
#healthIT
#hcrefor
#ACA
#ONC
#HL7
#Interop
#IoT
#HIMSS15
#POWHIT – People & Organizations improving Workflow w/HIT
#RareDisease
#foodallergy
#rheum
#bcsm
#gyncsm
#medx
#BlueButton
#patientengagement

Chats

#JACR 4th Thurs 12pm EST
#LCSM Every other Thurs 8pm EST
#BCSM Mon 9pm ET
#HCLDR Tues 8:30pm EST
#MedEd Thurs 9pm EST

and

@twubs @hashtracking or @tweetreachapp

 

My thanks to all my twitter friends who contributed

@HealthcareWen @HIMSS @lsaldanamd @sjdmd @HealthcareWen @DrJosephKim @dirkstanley @dlschermd @Docweighsin @RossMartin @CraigJoseph @RobertWahMD @ishakir @SteltsMD @JenniferJoeMD @StevenChanMD @CIBR_News @Jim_Rawson_MD @aussiclydesdale @ACRselect @AdamFuhriman @Gregmogel @ruthcarlosmd @techguy @MandiBPro @HITshrink @ahier @RandaPerkinsMD @motorcycle_guy @wareflo @susannahfox @Lygeia @ePatientDave @CMichaelGibson @Colin_Hung @annelizhannan @MelSmithJones @Paul_Sonnier @JennDennard @HIStalk @JohnNosta @2healthguru @lsaldanamd @lisagualtieri @EricTopol @ShahidNShah @DanMunro @Daniel_Kraft

 

Put yourself somewhere on the Social Media Adoption Curve

SocialMediaAdotpionCurve

 

Add LinkedIn and Facebook – they offer a different channel and voice – Facebook tends to be more social and LinkedIn tends to be more professional/business orientated

There are some good examples already out there

The Mayo Clinic has several properties and their own published guide book to social media and the University of Maryland Medical Center that has blended many channels

What Not to Do

The JAMA 2012 report Online posting of unprofessional content by medical students highlighted a high proportion of violations and problems and there are plenty of examples of people who failed use basic common sense – I personally like the 12 word Simple Social Media Policy from the Mayo

Don’t Lie
Don’t Pry
Don’t Cheat
Can’t Delete
Don’t Steal
Don’t Reveal

 

Conclusion

  • Social Media for Physicians is a Game Changer
  • Social media, when effective, will establish a physician’s brand and connect him/her with those in need of their services
  • With increased deductibles, more consumers will “shop” using social media sites.
  • Social Media will Expand the Physician’s Role with Patients
  • Social media is shaping patient encounters with physicians and that impact is expected to increase significantly
  • Extending the patient experience will foster existing patient relationships and improve patient outcomes, especially for long-term chronic conditions.

 

Where are you on the social media ladder and are you going to climb higher?

SociaMediaLadder

 

 

22 Pushups

22 Pushups

Honoring those Who Serve

22Pushups

So what’s the 22 Pushups challenge all about? It came from the Honor Courage Commitment organization who’s mission is to create elite veterans through education, mentorship, and community service. They started the #22Kill movement back in 2013 when they learned that a staggering 22 veterans are killed by suicide every day. There is some controversy over this statistic, the original source from a 2012 study and the detailed analysis but there is a higher rate of suicide amongst those who serve and even with controversy it should remain a priority – by any measure, this is a devastating epidemic of staggering proportions

It all started with my good friend and Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine Alumni Sue Roche as she took on the challenge and tagged friends – it inspired me and I followed along daily, adding my own set of 22 pushups to Sue’s each day. After a few days I was tagged and as they say the rest is history – as of writing I am on my 4th official day of 22 with some interesting opportunities to complete the challenge coming up in my travels

What do you have to do – the detailed instructions are here – record a video of you doing push-ups – it does not have to be 22 – every push up counts and they are being grabbed automatically to update the counter:

 

But you have to tag your post with

#22pressups for #22Kill

The number preceding the “press-ups” can be whatever you make it for the number – if you can get some other participants to complete the press ups at the same time you can multiply up. Then post it on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube or instagram and

 

Can you Hear me Now

Here’s the video from their YouTube channel featuring many contributing and many lost

 

How do you support them beyond raising the awareness and completing the challenge

  • Hire a Veteran
  • Volunteer
  • Become and Advocate, or
  • Donate

 

Joining the MedicAlert Board

Joining the MedicAlert Board

MedicAlert

I am excited to be elected to the MedicAlert Board joining Jessica Federer, head of digital development at Bayer. As Barton Tretheway, CAE, chair of the MedicAlert Foundation Board pointed out

Their collective experience aligns with our priorities and will be immeasurable to us as we look to leverage the power of new technology to expand the mission of MedicAlert Foundation, which is designed to help save lives

Which succinctly captures my feelings around this additional role. I personally experienced the value of the MedicAlert solution, brand and promise when I practiced as an Emergency Room physician in the United Kingdom. It was part of the standard procedure for any patient who arrived unconscious or confused to look for the signature bracelet

Traditional Medical Alert Bracelet

 

With its iconic Caduceus (similar but different to the Rod of Asclepius) which was the traditional sign of the God Hermes and became established as the symbol of medicine in the United States in the late  19th Century.

History of MedicAlert

The Original MedicalAlert User – Linda Collins

The history of MedicAlert dates back to the Early 1950’s developed by parents of Linda Collins who had an who had an anaphylactic reaction to tetanus anti toxin (which in her instance she only received a small scratch test as was the practice in 1953) and had a severe reaction. She survive but her parents Dr Marion Collins and his wife Chrissie realized that she was at risk and made a paper bracelet and note that was attached to her coat detailing her severe allergy.

 

 

 

 

 

In fact the original MedicAlert Bracelet is now in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Today

The Original Bracelet stored in the Smithsonian in Washington DC
The Original Bracelet stored in the Smithsonian in Washington DC

From these modest beginnings things have developed with early recognition by “Peace Officers”. The California Peace Officers magazine even ran an article back in January 1957 highlighting the MedicAlert bracelet to their members. In the era before mobile phones and always on communication it was a reliable way of identifying individuals and providing immediate access to a 24- hour phone line linked to critical and life saving information for that individual. This function continues today with a live 24/7 Emergency Response Service

I worked on one of these switchboards as a Medical Student many years ago

 

 

with full health and personal information including your personal health record and emergency contacts information and available in other countries including Australia, the UK, Canada and South Africa to mention a few through affiliates and partnered with many groups including AAFP, Alzheimer’s Association, ACEP, Autism Association, Philips LifeLine, National Alliance of Mental Illness, Food Allergy Initiative – to mention but a few

The age of computing brought new innovations and the ability to more readily store and retrieve more information for members and track and follow membership and presidential recognition dating back as far as April 9-16, 1978 when then President Jimmy Carter commemorated the occasion of MedicAlert and their contribution to Medic Alert week in April. Even Hollywood got in on the act with appearances of the MedicAlert in everything from the Today Show and Good Morning America to CHiPs

and Columbo

Peter Falk in Columbo

 

Moving into the Digital Age

The organization is moving into the digital age with solutions around stored medical records, moving to digital mobile formats and storage solutions and even exploring the potential for RFID enabled solutions and in partnership with the American Medical Association has a joint venture on advanced directives.

Back in 1956 Dr Marion Collins commented that

“I think I can save more lives with MedicAlert that I’ll ever save with my scalpel”

Which is much like my own perception of medicine and the opportunity of Digital Health that I saw 30 years ago and continues to be the case. It’s this combination of a storied brand and concept from MedicAlert as a foundation and the opportunity to update for the new Digital world we live in that presents such an exciting opportunity. We are facing a Silver Tsunami of people who struggle to age in their homes and technology and solutions that help them do so, safely and with the support of their relatives and the health system will be in high demand.

I’m looking forward to working with my fellow board members and the MedicAlert team to continue the tradition and build on the brand with a Digital update and twist

 

 

 

 

 

 

Channeling Churchill to deal with innovation, impatience and chaos in healthcare

Channeling Churchill to deal with innovation, impatience and chaos in healthcare

Photo Courtesy of UniSci24
Photo Courtesy of UniSci24

To say that healthcare is changing is to understate the situation dramatically. The combination of new technology and a demand by payers and consumers for more value for their money has created an environment rich in both innovation and impatience. You may think you are moving swiftly, but no matter how quickly your organization is adapting, both payers and consumers are tapping their collective feet and wondering why it’s taking you so long to get with the program.

Consumers now expect digital access to everything 24x7x365. The online world has taught us that this is not only possible, but even routine – everywhere but healthcare. So their impatience with our slowness is understandable. They can search at 3 a.m. for answers to health questions that we as healthcare providers haven’t given them. Given that many of the answers they find on the internet may be dangerously wrong, it’s time we did a better job answering their questions, even at 3 a.m.

Payers, too, are impatient for change. They want value-based contracting and want to reward results, not volume of procedures done.

Technology is behind much of this, because appropriate use of technology can speed up the process of everything we do. Beyond speed of connection, though, technology will change, at a very basic level, the way we deliver healthcare.

In speaking of a fundamental change in healthcare, I’m thinking particularly of analytics and the progress toward what I call “augmented intelligence.” While artificial intelligence has a long road to travel to match the thinking abilities of the human brain, technology can now augment our capabilities. Technology can take over the tedious task of searching for data and looking for patterns, giving us an invaluable assistant. No human is capable of reviewing clinical data and images from thousands, even millions, of patients to find the knowledge hidden in those terabytes. But a computer with the right software can do it quickly and efficiently, giving caregivers access to new knowledge.

Finding the zebras among the horses

Computers can also profoundly improve decision support systems, broadening the thinking of physicians. If you ever read the New York Times column, Think Like a Physician, you will understand just how useful this could be. In that column, the author presents a diagnostic challenge that has stumped many physicians before being resolved. Often, it takes months and many different physicians before an accurate diagnosis is made.

In training, we learn that when you hear hoof beats, think horses, not zebras. In other words, think of the common things first. But now and again, those hoof beats turn out to be zebras, and we often miss the subtle differences that tell us that zebras are lurking over the horizon, not horses. We keep looking for horses while the zebras roam freely around our feet. Conversely, we may think we see a zebra when it’s just a pony with odd coloring. This happens in part because we are searching in the dark, and it’s hard to tell a horse from a zebra with the lights off. An augmented intelligence system could help sort through a patient’s complex set of symptoms and clinical findings to offer up a broader range of ranked possibilities and recommendations for testing that could pinpoint the diagnosis. It could flip the light switch and make it easier for us to see whether it’s a herd of zebras or a herd of horses making all that noise.

A new kind of medical progress: R2D2 (or possibly C3PO) will see you now

Vinod Khosla, co-founder of Sun Microsystems, has said, “In the next 10 years, data science and software will do more for medicine than all of the biological sciences together.” He has also noted, “By 2025, 80 percent of the functions doctors do will be done much better and much more cheaply by machines and machine learned algorithms.”

But, even if he is right, that doesn’t mean that doctors won’t be needed. On the contrary, it will allow physicians to bypass the really boring part of their jobs and do that 20 percent of functions that require a thinking, feeling human being to accomplish. It will also extend our resources dramatically, which is important, because the US Department to Health and Human Services predicts that by 2020 we will need 20,400 more physicians, just in the U.S., than will be available.

And it’s not just the supply of doctors that will see a shortfall. Globally, the World Health Organization says that 15% of the need for doctors and nurses isn’t being met. Moreover, in Africa, that shortfall is dramatically worse. The continent has about 24% of the world’s disease burden but has only 2% of the global health resources. The unequal distribution of medical expertise is a serious problem that technology can help solve, with telehealth solutions and cheap, portable diagnostic testing solutions.

And it’s not just the role of physicians that will change

Profound as the changes are that will be coming to medical professionals, healthcare executives are facing an even more profound change in the way they will perform their work. The move from fee-for-service and opaque claims and billings systems toward value-based care and transparent pricing is happening rapidly, and it will require a complete overhaul of the thinking and strategizing of most healthcare executive teams.

Everything you thought you knew about how to make your organization financially successful will change. Profit centers like radiology and diagnostic imaging will become cost centers; the more high-end expensive care you give, which once supported all the more mundane services you provide, the lower your profits will be. Instead of filling beds, your job will be to keep them empty.

It’s a big challenge, but the same kind of augmented intelligence systems that will help physicians keep patients healthy can help you keep your organization healthy. Analytics can help you identify and stratify risk, so that you can contract with payers at rates that won’t kill your bottom line. And it can help you identify gaps in care that could lead to the need for expensive treatments and procedures.

Technology can also help you keep patients healthy. Telehealth and remote monitoring are making significant improvements in chronic disease outcomes.

To face the challenge, be like Churchill

The cultural change required by all this progress will likely create anxiety and chaos within your organization. But it doesn’t have to do so. If the CEO and executive teams stay calm and focused, the people they lead will be less anxious and more able to think creatively.

Remember London in 1940? Bombs were falling nightly from Nazi warplanes, and the city was literally on fire. Hitler believed that by bombing population centers, he could sow panic among the people and make invasion possible. But the people of London didn’t panic. Their leader, Winston Churchill, personified the advice to “Keep calm and carry on.” That firm hand at the wheel of the nation gave the people of London and of the entire country a model to follow. Rather than chaos, the Nazi attacks created incredible resourcefulness that resulted in remarkable innovation that helped win the war.

So when the task of facing the upheaval in healthcare seems too much, channel the spirit of Churchill and keep calm and carry on.

You also might want to get your physician to prescribe for you what Otto C. Pickhardt, MD, prescribed for Churchill in 1932, when he was recovering from being hit by a car on Fifth Avenue in New York: “alcoholic spirits especially at meal times. The quantity is naturally indefinite but the minimum requirements would be 250 cubic centimeters.” For my non-scientific American readers, that’s about 8.4 ounces or about 10 shots!

 

I’d moderate that dose a bit, but I’d go with Churchill’s choice of medicine, whiskey. Sometimes chaos and challenge require you to sit back, take a deep breath and get some perspective. I find that a good single malt Scottish whiskey gives me a broader view of the world and my place in it. And I find that my thinking can become quite innovative after a couple of ounces.

The original appeared on HealthBlawg’s Festschrift Tenth Blogiversary here

Men’s Health Week

Having a “Y” is No Excuse

It was Men’s Health week Jun 13 – 19 and I had the pleasure of talking to the Talk Ten Tuesday host Chuck Buck last week (Tuesday Jun 21)  to offer some thoughts and insights for their listeners and in particular for women thinking about any men in their lives

 

Most women know about their own health but not so much about men yet most women have men in their lives – sons, brothers, fathers, partners. Here are some of the highlights of the challenges in men’s Health

More men are born than women but that lead disappears quickly – in 1920 women outlived men by 1 year that’s now up to 5 years women outlive men. Having a “Y” Chromosome is not the reason for the poorer health of men.
Men “lead” in the top 15 causes death with the exception of Alzheimer’s (and that’s because men don’t live as long and as a result experience less Alzheimer’s).

Mars and Venus

This is the Mars vs Venus Gender gap in health. Men, like women have some diseases that are specific to them – prostate disease for example, but despite 1 in 6 being diagnosed with prostate cancer only 1 in 35 die from the disease. But most diseases are a shared problems – they strike both men and women. The leading issues for both gender’s are:

Heart Disease

  • Cardiovascular – men lead in heart un healthiness – but ladies are catching up
  • Heart disease and stroke – leading cause of death
  • Men develop atherosclerosis ~5 years earlier than women
  • Diet, Exercise, and fitness – don’t forget sleep
  • Cholesterol, blood pressure

If you want to explore the gender differences and causes of death head over to World Life Expectancy

Cancer

Lung cancer remains a threat – tobacco causes 90% of lung cancer and is causing ~158,000 deaths each year but there are gender differences; ~85,000 in men and ~72,000 in women (that’s more than enough to fill the Superdome every year)

Mental Health

But when it comes to Mental Health, Depression and Suicide we thought this affected men more than women but this may just be that men hide their feelings better and men also tend to seek help less for depression and while women attempt suicide more than men, more men die of suicide as they are more “successful”:

That’s about 100 people per day who commit suicide

Diabetes

“The high sugar of diabetes is anything but sweet”

The sugar is a slow poison inducing:

  • Heart attacks
  • strokes
  • blindness
  • kidney failure, and
  • amputations

If you were born after the year 2000 as a boy your chances of developing Diabetes is 1 in 3

“The combination of diabetes and obesity may be erasing some of the reductions in heart disease risk we’ve had over the last few decades”

So what should women do – as they should for themselves, encourage exercise (30 minutes per day reduces the chances of diabetes by 50% for men)  and a balanced and healthy diet. Not ignoring problems and focusing on prevention helping men seek medical help, but above all give them a hug and help them share and talk about their feelings

 

 

The identity Problem

The identity Problem

I struggle to keep my contacts in order and synchronized, not just across devices but across ecosystems and channels. How do you keep your old style digitized version of the rolodex in sync with your twitter followers and LinkedIn connections? How do you know when your friends join a new social media channel that you are member of so you can connect there?

I’ve tried many tools and techniques and had been using Brewster which recently was acquired by FullContact and the transition offered me 3 months of premium access to their service. The free version offers backup and some syncing across limited accounts – the premium version expands to multiple accounts and includes business card scanning.

The early results were surprising – in my contact database the system was offering me updates to over 40% of my contacts. I was suspicious but as I investigated I discovered that using some clever back end algorithms it was revealing updates to many of my connections including some I validated manually that good friends revealed were early forays into social media including a blog on Ice Cream and a corresponding Pinterest account.

So in social media and the commercial world we can link data and people – in fact the commercial organizations do this very effectively that Target collected enough information on individuals linked through a unique identifier to identify a high school student was pregnant and mail her maternity adverts before the “news” had leaker to her father

“Target assigns every customer a Guest ID number, tied to their credit card, name, or email address that becomes a bucket that stores a history of everything they’ve bought and any demographic information Target has collected from them or bought from other sources”

The healthcare system is rife with enough challenges – why is it we have one that is of our own making. Why is there so much resistance to the idea of uniquely identifying a patient so we can attach the correct medical data to the correct person and deliver the correct medical treatment to that same individual?

In 1996 the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was signed into law and it specifically called for

“a standard unique health identifier for each individual”

But in 1998, Congress eliminated that requirement and even prohibited the use of federal funds to develop a unique identifier. Anyone who knows me will know my passion for privacy and individual rights but in this instance the harm and cost foisted on the system, providers, payers and ultimately the patients is gargantuan!

Figure: The Percentage of Waste by country spent on Healthcare Administrative and Insurance

The Social Security number has become the de facto universal (and most valued) US national identifier. Created in 1935 for the purposes of tracking social security benefits it has been hijacked and subsumed into multiple other uses. The gathering and use of this placed a large target on the back of healthcare data and as of the end of last year over 112 Million healthcare records were breached.

As far back as 2009 HIMSS issued a Patient Identity Integrity White Paper making the case for identity management and in 2010 the recently retired Gartner Analyst and Research Director Barry Hieb and now Chief Scientist at Global Patient Identifiers wrote this piece in e-Journal of Health Informatics: A Cost Effective Method to Create a Universal Healthcare Identifier System (full pdf here) advocating the need and a path to the creation of a universal patient identifier

The prohibitive cost associated with creating a universal healthcare identifier has been one of the primary barriers to the creation of such a system. The Voluntary Universal Healthcare Identifier (VUHID) project takes a radically different approach to solving this problem compared to previous proposals. This article examines the economic impact of this approach and discusses why the unique VUHID approach permits implementation of the system at a small fraction of previously estimated costs.

Despite a rational approach that enabled individualized control and security it has not taken off. We continue to waste resources, duplicate tests, decrease the overall safety and increase errors in our healthcare system that according to the RAND study: Identity Crisis; An Examination of the Costs and Benefits of a Unique Patient Identifier for the U.S. Health Care System could offer a saving of $77 billion per year if implemented with sufficient penetration – they cite 90% level of adoption.

Have a I raised your heckles advocating for a unique identifier – is it as Adrian Gropper chief technology officer for Patient Privacy Rights stated

Implementing a unique patient identifier would add nothing to our health care system beyond coercive surveillance

Or as Twila Brase, RN, is cofounder and president of Citizens’ Council for Health Freedom, says its important not to have it to prevent the creation of a “nationalized” healthcare system (I’d interpret this as a single payer system like the VA and Medicare?)

The most important reason is our opposition to building a national health care system. Without a national identification card for patients, it would be difficult to nationalize health care

 

Or do you side with Douglas Fridsma, MD, PhD, is president and CEO of the American Medical Informatics Association who says people care a lot about the privacy and security of their medical data but want immediate access and transferability with control over who can see and use their medical data and believes that

Giving every American a unique patient ID could help address all of those issues.

 

Join me Thursday April 28 at 7pm for #CMIOChat: The Identity Problem. We will be covering the following questions

 

  1. Why does the US not have a Unique Patient Identifier?
  2. Is it possible we can come up with agree and use a Unique National Patient Identifier and if so how?
  3. What alternatives are practical and cost effective to a Unique patient identifier
  4. How do we protect patient confidentiality and privacy in a world with a unique patient identifier?

 

The Dell World DoMoreHIT Panel

The Dell World DoMoreHIT Panel

On Tuesday March 15th, 2016 a the Dell Lounge at South by Southwest (SXSW) we hosted the #DoMoreHIT Thinktank event.

This was Dell’s 5th’s annual healthcare Think Tank. Together with my good friend and colleague Mandi Bishop – Healthcare Analytics Innovations & Consulting Practice Lead, Dell, #HIT100 influencer, @MandiBPro we were joined by a veritable who’s who of thought leaders from healthcare and related industries for an outstanding set of panelists:

  • Claudia Williams, Sr. Advisor, Health Innovation and Technology at White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

2016DoMoreHITPanelists

 

 

We divided the session up into three segments –  Data explosion in Healthcare, Embracing New Technology and How to be Future Ready

 

The Data Explosion in Healthcare

  • Physicians, patients and health systems are over whelmed with data – is there too much noise to discern the signal of relevance?
  • Is there any focus area for gathering or managing data that healthcare should target over others (wearables vs genomics vs population health vs clinical data vs lab values vs imaging for example)? And are there data sources outside those traditionally considered “health” that you’d consider particularly relevant?
  • What can patients – and clinicians – do to get ready for the deluge of data and information that they will be receiving and become increasingly responsible for managing?
  • How can we, as an industry, and our individual organizations help make the vast quantities of diverse data into meaningful information that can be readily understood?
  • How much do you trust the quality of the data sources your organization is using for BI and analytics? And how do you address it if/when you don’t trust the data quality?
  • If your organization is collecting data about your patients/consumers, do you offer that data – and any health insights derived from it – back to those patients/consumers? If so, how? And if not, why not?

 

 

Embracing New Technology

  • How do we embrace technology while keeping the focus on patient and compassion?
  • Is there any new technology that stands out as delivering value that patients, clinicians and health systems can jump on, now?
  • Do you think there’s a fear amongst healthcare providers that digital health technology, in conjunction with advanced analytics, will change – perhaps reduce – the role of the clinician in healthcare delivery?
  • What do you see as ripe opportunities for emerging technology to disrupt healthcare? What’s already been done that’s working, and what do you think is on the horizon that’s about to break?
  • How do we make wearable technology and remote monitoring accessible to the underserved populations who may best benefit?
  • What do you think are the biggest obstacles to tech adoption (for consumers and for providers/industry)?

 

 

Future Ready Healthcare

  • What does being “future-ready” mean to you and your organization? How can you be future ready in the age of constant and increasingly rapid change?
  • What one thing do you think will change the future of healthcare this year, in 3 years and in 10 years?
  • Increasingly people want personalized health and wellness care – how do we deliver that with the current system that does not readily enable personalization (both from a technology perspective and from an incentives perspective)?
  • Do you believe precision medicine principles – genomics informing personalized clinical pathways – are sustainable across vast numbers of people? Or are they perhaps best narrowly applied to complex disease states with limited number of affected persons? And how will incentives have to change to align?
  • When was the last time your doctor asked you how you’d like to be engaged? And if they’ve asked you, have they done what you suggested?
  • Do you have a formal patient/member advisory board/council? If so, how does it work? And if not, why not?

 

The event was a great success and despite the global LiveStream issues at the time we managed to trend #2 on Twitter just behind #IndianaJones

TwitterTrend

 

As of writing there have been over 20M #DoMoreHIT impressions and the material continues to provide additional utility and is in use in other forums. The venue itself was packed and there have to date been 2,500+ Livestream views and ongoing On-Demand promotion and use. In house attendees and online described it as the “best panel yet!”

The 3 sessions from LiveStream can be viewed here

2016 #DoMoreHIT Healthcare Think Tank by Dell

Watch Dell’s 2016 #DoMoreHIT Healthcare Think Tank on Livestream.com. The fifth annual #DoMoreHIT Healthcare Think Tank, hosted by Dell, once again brings together a panel of leading social influencers impacting healthcare to discuss burning issues and trends to expect in 2016.

The Highlight Reel from the Dell Lounge Week Long Activities

Dell lounge Photos here

National Doctors Day

National Doctors Day

8Ton Orca jumping out of Ocean

On February 21, 1991 President George Bush declared in Proclamation 6253 March 30 would be National Doctors Day:

There is no greater reward in our profession than the knowledge that God has entrusted us with the physical care of His people. The Almighty has reserved for Himself the power to create life, but He has assigned to a few of us the responsibility of keeping in good repair the bodies in which this life is sustained

In honor of my colleagues and the countless others who make up the healthcare service and who struggle daily with the delivery of healthcare and the challenges of a system that is broken but still delivers outstanding care:

Always Believe in Yourself

For me:

Every Smart Person is Working in Healthcare small

Its an exciting and challenging time and the healthcare service is dependent on the clinical skills and dedication of Doctors to deliver excellent healthcare – take a moment to thank your clinical professional for all they do on a daily basis. The glass is full – 1/2 full of water and 1/2 full of air and I’m excited about the future and what’s coming and hope my friends and colleagues are too:

Excited - Winnie-the-Pooh

What 2016 will Bring for Healthcare Technology

2015 was an incredible year in technology and healthcare; from new consumer technology and personalized devices coming to market to the introduction of new supercomputers that reduce the time and cost of healthcare data analysis. It’s been great to see how innovation continues to penetrate the medical profession, improving patient services and care. As we look to 2016, there are some areas that we can expect technology to further impact.

Dance like no one watching Encrypt - Security

Growing patient concern over security

Security is a major concern for consumers and the healthcare industry, and the threat of it is only rising. While technology and data provides patients with the precise, personalized medicine that they want, individuals have not forgotten the security breaches that occurred this past year, which had heightened their concern, particularly with the type of personal information in medical records. Implementing stronger, more reliable and transparent security practices will be a critical objective for medical practitioners, but equally important will be reestablishing trust with their patients and consumers.

The consumerization of healthcare

Consumers have grown to expect personal and custom experiences from technology.  The consumerization of healthcare will gather greater momentum and the healthcare industry will see the first effects of this trend on individual behavior in 2016. By treating patients and individuals seeking healthier lifestyles as consumers, the healthcare and related technology developed becomes more and more applicable to serving their needs and meeting them where they are. This is a great thing. As an example, imagine telehealth kiosks now allow patients to engage in a face-to-face video consult with their doctor, or have their vitals taken and receive a diagnosis – without setting foot in their doctor office.  Pilot programs for these “pods” are being tested in Rite Aid and the Cleveland Clinic.

The latest innovations will further fuel the moment around treating patients as consumers and developing relevant technology that make it easier for them to monitor their health and seek treatment, driving more adoption and healthier populations.

IoT - We have to go out for Dinner - Fridge not Talking to Stove

Embracing the Internet of Things toward patient engagement

The Internet of Things (IoT) connects billions of objects around the world, and in 2016, the healthcare industry will take the first steps in tapping IoT’s full potential through passive monitoring. Leveraging wearables and connected devices, healthcare organizations, with the consent of patients will be able to passively monitor the wellness of patients and personalize their experience. For example, for those with chronic diseases, such as diabetes or heart disease, these devices can monitor all aspects of the patient’s  daily life to provide insight to the patient and the healthcare providers, into how different activities, such as eating, sleeping or watching TV, affects his or her body. Connected devices equipped with real-time feedback can provide subtle alerts that prompt, caution or encourage patients to stick with or avoid certain behaviors.  These devices can also help them to comply with a treatment or regimen. In 2016, we’ll see the industry understand that subtle patient engagement through passive monitoring can have positive, long-term effects on behavioral change.

 

The potential of ICD-10

While the rollout of ICD-10 was reluctantly undertaken by some in 2015, the healthcare industry will begin to realize its actual potential in 2016. As a result of ICD-10, healthcare organizations will receive a higher level of granularity in the clinical data that has been collected including patient information and clinical data.  Utilizing this data will enable new insights and deeper analysis.  This will be the first step in turning descriptive healthcare analytics to predictive and prescriptive insights enabling results like reducing readmission and improving population health management. However, as we see potential benefits being realized, discussions will center on the interoperability of systems that is limiting analysis and holding back potential insights.

Africa-Kids-iPad

More democratized, globalized healthcare

While diseases such as AIDS and malaria are now considered chronic or curable with the proper treatment, there are still geographical, technological and societal barriers that pose great challenges when trying to treat the demographics that are most commonly affected. In the third world and emerging countries, healthcare organizations are leveraging technology, including simple mobile devices, to provide patients with faster, more effective care. In 2016, we will see more companies create technology that democratizes healthcare with innovations that help to lower the cost of healthcare, enhance patient engagement and improve overall worldwide population health.

Not only is it exciting to imagine how we’ll see technology continue to evolve and change everyday life, but also fascinating to see the impact and opportunities for enabling healthcare providers. These trends will manifest in some exciting and innovative changes in 2016 that will have a tremendous impact and further improvements in patient care.

 

This post originally appeared in HealthIT Outcomes

 

Original

 

 

The Disgrace of Concealing Safety Data in the NFL

This piece in the NY Times makes sobering reading:

In N.F.L., Deeply Flawed Concussion Research and Ties to Big Tobacco

“As we looked more deeply into the specific area of concussions, we realized that there were many more questions than answers,” Mr. Tagliabue wrote. The committee’s chairman, Dr. Elliot Pellman, the team physician for the Jets, emphasized that his group aimed to produce research that was “independent” and “meticulous.”

 

As reported by the NYT the concussions research was deeply flawed and drawing expertise from companies who cut their teeth working for tobacco companies and as the evidence mounts it is hard to draw anything but a very negative view of the organizations and their behavior towards the players and their health. The big questions is how much did they know and how deliberate was this cover up in the name of corporate profits?

Value-based care Making proprietary PACS and basic VNAs extinct

Value-based care Making proprietary PACS and basic VNAs extinct

The move toward value-based reimbursement is shaking up traditional healthcare in all kinds of ways, as connectivity and cost-effectiveness become critical attributes in care delivery. Proprietary PACS, used in image acquisition systems, are starting to feel the squeeze from this dual pressure, as vendor-neutral archives take over many of their functions.

ExpectBetter

A recent study by Markets and Markets predicts a PACS-less Radiology world by 2018. Donald Dennison, Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) Board director-at-large and the chair of the American College of Radiology (ACR) Connect Committee told attendees at the opening session for SIIM 2015, there are three external market forces that are trickling down into the imaging informatics world and leading to the demise of PACS: Money, EMR adoption and consolidation.

While PACS have traditionally been the workhorses of diagnostic imaging, providing workflows, viewing and archiving, their use of proprietary formats severely limited the ability of an organization to freely share images and created unnecessary and expensive complications in managing storage. They are a prime example of the episodic-care model, in which care delivery processes were created without regard to the broader needs of a patient. With the move toward value-based care, this episodic approach is rapidly being replaced by a patient-centric model, and proprietary silos are rapidly and rightly going the way of the dinosaur. In this case, value-based payments are the meteor strike that will so radically change the environment that these beasts are no longer equipped for survival.

Vendor-neutral archives (VNA), which can gather all the images into a standardized, patient-centered storage model, makes image sharing much easier. And VNAs have added on workflow and viewing capabilities that make PACS mostly superfluous. While having a VNA to unify all your diagnostic imaging is a good idea, it also has limitations. A simple VNA is more evolved than a PACS, but without more evolution and growth, it too will be unable to survive in the changed environment created by value-based payments. Fortunately, the VNA model is more adaptable than most PACS and is rapidly evolving to be far more than a DICOM-image repository.

An important part of value-based care is the ability to unify all data associated with a patient and deliver the right parts of that data where and when they are needed. That requires not only DICOM images, but also associated clinical data and documents and non-DICOM documentary images (such photos to document wound care). And all of that data must be integrated with the patient’s electronic health record. Finally, a layer of analytics is needed to ensure that relevant data can be extracted as needed.

Beyond individual patients, we have an opportunity to learn more about the progression of diseases if we can use this unified data in our predictive and population health analytics. In an article in Clinical Innovation+Technology, radiologists Eliot Siegel, MD and Gary Wendt, MD noted that this larger, unified data may soon offer unique value for diagnostic purposes and new clinical insights.

 

The article quotes Dr. Wendt (Dr. Wendt is the vice chair of informatics, professor of radiology, and enterprise director of medical imaging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison) saying

“Today when people are talking about big data and data mining, they are still talking about text. They’re not talking about actually mining content out of images. I think that’s probably the next generation, actually processing image data, not just text data. Ultimately, the clinical impact of such next-generation image archiving would come from the creation of more relevant reports [..based on data mining…]. This would be especially beneficial in oncology, where treatments can be modified based on tumor progression, and comparisons to similar cohorts of patients at an oncologist’s fingertips would be useful,”

As the VNA grows beyond image archiving, maybe a new name will be needed. The pre-release statement for a new IDC report (due out in December 2015) suggests a new description: Application Independent Clinical Archive. But I still like Dell’s name for our version of this archive (I work for Dell): Unified Clinical Archive.

By whatever name you call it, we are moving toward a truly patient-centered archive that will offer far more value than PACS or the simpler versions of VNAs. That’s good for all of us.

This article originally appeared on Autnminnie

 

Achieving Effective Population Health

value-based-payments - nvt

The move to value-based payments will be the most significant trend of 2016, because it will force both caregivers and health plans to radically change the way they think and act. Population health, which emphasizes identifying risk and gaps in care, and filling those gaps, will be an existential capability for hospitals, physicians and health plans. If they get it right, they will prosper. If not, they will struggle at best or worse, wither and fail.

Effective population healthcare requires both a change in thinking and adoption of new technology for success. Organizations that have focused on episodic care and procedures to pay the bills will be the most challenged, because a completely new mindset will be needed.

If you are a surgeon who has been highly valued by a hospital because you bring in lucrative procedures, your life will change radically over the next couple of years.

  • Hospitals will be looking to physicians who can reduce costs and avoid the need for expensive interventions to help them succeed.
  • The surgeons (and other procedure-based specialties) will still be needed, of course, but they won’t have the rarified status in the future that they enjoy today.

Those who can find innovative ways to help patients improve their health status without a hospital stay or other expensive interventions will be the most successful in this new world.

Hospitals and physicians will also need to add technological capabilities to succeed. They will need to integrate data, analyze that data and use telehealth and remote monitoring to provide more effective use of resources and delivery of care. For many organizations, data integration probably seems overwhelming with too many applications speaking disparate languages.

The good news is that technology exists now which can create a nearly seamless interface among all these silos and allow data from a wide variety of sources to be used for population health, better treatments and more efficient operations.

Physicians will find a light at the end of the tunnel for those who hate their EHRs, as new vendors provide applications that make using an EHR simpler and more efficient. These vendors are creating applications that use the EHR and other clinical applications like a database, presenting patient data in a simpler, more clinically relevant user interface. This will mean that organizations can make their caregivers much more satisfied and efficient without having to ditch the huge investments they’ve made in clinical technology.

The next year will be a wild ride for many organizations, as they adapt to all these changes, but the work and effort should pay off in all kinds of important ways, liberating data for effective use in traditional clinical and patient care and unleashing innovation for its use and in new and unimagined ways.

This article originally appeared on the HIMSS16 Conference Blog here

 

Digital Health for the Undeserved

Digital Health for the Undeserved

A recent report published by Jane Sarsohn-Kahn for the California Health Foundation: Digitizing the Safety Net Health Tech Opportunities for the Undeserved offers some deep insights into reaching the population most in need of help but often left out in the discussions of the latest and greatest technology to break into the news cycle.

As pointed out low-income households have access to mobile technology with 8 out of 10 sending and receiving text messages – in fact mobile phone usage and ownership mirrors the experience in Africa where many of the communities have little choice given the paucity of existing infrastructure and have bypassed the traditional communications systems in favor of mobile networks
Adults who own a cell phone, Africa

and gave rise to a whole innovation of mobile banking that originated that pre-dated, is more flexible and is more widely used than anything developed in the west (The M-Pesa system) – servicing the unbanked people of Africa without requirements to have a smart phone nor to use an app. I’ve written about the opportunity we have of learning from our African friends in the past)
In the case of the undeserved here in the US many of these people mirror these experiences and providing easy access using simple tools is effective not just from a cost standpoint (as Healthcrowd showed $1 for mobile messaging vs $34 for paper mailing) – and that’s even before you consider the engagement/response rate we find with mobile applications and interactions…think about it, when you want to reach your children do you send them an email or text them

Textpectation

 

Take the time to read about the multiple projects that are reaping big benefits and doing so cost effectively. These are real working projects with a range of technology that has demonstrable impacts and could be applied to many more groups and environments. The extensive piece takes you on a journey from everything as simple as text messaging from Healthcrowd to the medication adherence and tracking concepts of Proteus Digital Health of digestible sensors that track your pill from manufacture to ingestion.

There are a few guiding principles to help steer you to success

  • Meet people where they are – widely varied and none are typical
  • Build Trust – under promise, over deliver; everything is fragile for this community and failure can be far more catastrophic for them than “average” users
  • Address social determinants of health – just providing a ride to get to the clinic could mean the difference between success and failure and an Uber Ride is a lot more cost effective than an ambulance required for the crisis that could have been averted
  • Consider the cost of data service – data is expensive on many plans treat it like memory used to be in the days of 640K
  • Recognize the many layers of health literacy – not just comprehension but basic literacy and even language
  • Speak in the Vernacular – and make it culturally sensitive too

As Aman Bhandari said

“The new sexy is scaling what can work”

Proven solutions that have been effective provide great opportunities for those looking to make that impact on their own area.

 

 

 

7 Tips for the Best HIMSS16 Experience

7 Tips for the Best HIMSS16 Experience

 

This year will be my 19th year at HIMSS – things have grown significantly since 1997 when HIMSS was held in San Diego with a record number of attendees – 15,800 and 408 exhibitors (you can read more of the history going back as far as 1961 here). At the time I remember being overwhelmed adn that was before things had grown to the most recent statistics for 2015 now at over 43,000 attendees

 

HIMSS16 SMA BadgeThis year I am part of the HIMSS Social Media Ambassador program joining my 19 colleagues to help provide a guide that was not available back in 1997 to help guide you through the landscape of the HIMSS conference and get the best experience possible

If you do nothing else – follow my friends and colleagues on the list at the bottom. Their feed and content will keep you up to speed on the latest news, events and any last minute gems to keep you getting the most from the events and activities

 

 

 

As part of this opportunity I also the present the following 7 rules/suggestions things to help you get the best from HIMSS 16 in Las Vegas

 

Rule 1: Have Fun

HaveFun

Rules 2: Hack your Conference Badge to Include your Social Media Handle

This used to require some clever editing of the name in the system but it has gotten easier – all you need to do is put you Twitter handle in Nickname field

HIMSSHackBadge
Rule 3: Look up

SocialMedaiEverywhere
Don’t bury your nose in your phone and technology the whole time – part fo the value is the exchange with real people and real activities. When you get in the inevitable line for a taxi or shuttle at Las Vegas airport talk to your fellow travelers – you never know who you might meet and what they might share about their business, news or the conference. You might even be able to shorten the wait and share a ride.

Rule 4: Prepare and Plan and then Adapt

Your plans will change but if you come with no plan you will end up missing more. Depending on your organizational preferences either fill your gmail calendar with your plan or download the Apple or Android HIMSS16 App and use it to checkout the daily sessions and listing of keynote speakers, exhibitor listing, maps and the social media activity feed which will have the latest news from the show floor

Look for the sessions you really want to attend and grab the details and add to your schedule now – you may not make it but you stand a better chance of making it if its on your plan.

Rule 5: Enjoy the Parties but Don’t Stay Late

How you manage this may depend on what time zone you came from but be warned the days are long and can be physically and mentally exhausting

Celebrate but my advice is enjoy the parties and social activities but don’t burn the candle completely – get to bed especially so you can get up early to exercise before hitting the show floor. You may get your steps just walking the floor but even if you do 30 minutes in the gym will energize you to cope with the busy days on the show floor

Rule 6: Leave the Laptop in the Hotel Room

I know a full sized keyboard is great to have but the additional weight of a laptop will weigh heavily on your shoulder. If you can use your phone as your main device and carry a spare battery or a Portable Battery Charging device like this one and/or charging cable and plug

Like this 10ft cable

An extra long one would be helpful when accessing difficult and hard to reach ports)

If you really need the larger device – go with the tablet format but bear in mind the bigger the device the more weight you are carrying around every day

Rule 7: Stay Connected Socially

Use social media to stay connected and find out the latest adn greatest things going on at the conference. You can use Social media just as a lurker and to access information but this is a great opportunity to ascend the social media ladder of engagement

 

SociaMediaLadder

Use your phone to take pictures – post your experiences and things you see and tag everything with the official #HIMSS16 hashtag. But its not just twitter – there are other channels and some can help you share to a wider audience. If you set up your instagram account to link to twitter and facebook you can post from here and populate both your twitter and Facebook feed.

For short videos (less than 6 seconds) – Vine is great for capturing and sharing across multiple channels

Facebook has been rolling out a live streaming feature and if it is available in your newsfeed you could try this for any exciting presentations or interactions

And expect some addition of live streaming from Twitter’s Persicope and the more recent interactive streaming from Blab

Enjoy the conference – it presents a host of opportunities to learn, meet new people and renew old friendships. You are in Las Vegas – you never know you might win some great new friends – to start you off here is a list of my colleagues and friends who are also Social Media Ambassadors

 

 

The Patient Electronic Show – CES

The Patient Electronic Show – CES

https://digitalhealthsummit.com
CES Digital Health Summit

Once again I am headed to CES this year. Last year the DigitalHealth pavilion was overflowing with people, innovation, and wearables designed to influence us to a healthier life.

The show still features the big sections of technology for cars, televisions and 3-D printers but much of the show is being turned over to healthcare and the Digital Health pavilion. Like my friend and colleague Jane Sarasohn-Kahn I see the big move towards high-deductible consumer driven health plans (HDHP) beinge a key part of the major uptake in digital health devices and wearables. We already got a sneak peek into this post the holiday period with FitBit rising to the top of the Apple App store charts and coming in in the top 3 of Amazon’s list of holiday gifts.

So this years hot trends

Wearables and the Internet of Medical Things

With personal financial responsibility comes a much bigger focus on the costs of healthcare services and how to avoid them. To avoid expensive costs later in life requires focus on behavior now on as captured in this excellent graphic from Bridgitte Piniewski, MD:

Lifestyle is the biggest factor in improving health
Lifestyle is the biggest factor in improving health

Expect CES 2016 to feature much more Digital Health and especially focused on the Internet of (Medical) Things – the key to engagement is making the workflow frictionless. Its no use creating yet another app or solution that requires consumers to download, install, learn or use yet another option. The success in this space will be around integrated solutions.

Wearables will expand and include even more data and the recent announcement of Samsung of the expanded capability in their new health-focused chip

that will add body fat, skeletal muscle mass, heart rate and rhythm, skin temperature, and stress level to the biometric tracking capabilities.

Expect many more additional features to the wearables mobile platform with add on modules, some already on show like the Philips Ultrasound, others work in progress

3-D Printing

Reaching new levels of innovation. Simple ideas like creating 3-D models base don actual patient anatomy prior to taking on complex surgery, printing prosthetics that are customized to the individual but now increasingly merged with wearables and printing biosensing strips that can be used for in home diagnostic testing. Researchers at Florida Atlantic University printed strip with bio material including antibodies and nanoparticles that can detect bacteria and viruses

 

Thin, lightweight and flexible materials developed by researchers at Florida Atlantic University, Stanford University and Harvard University, integrate cellulose paper and flexible polyester films as new diagnostic tools to detect bioagents in whole blood, serum and peritoneal fluid. Credit: Florida Atlantic University

Artificial Intelligence

Take a look at Lunit that helps physicians make accurate diagnosis with machine learning that offers object detection (application of existing technology to the healthcare domain)

No Title

No Description

There are others including IBM’s Watson for Healthcare and in our Dell’s portfolio announced at RSNA ZebraMed

 

Repurposing Existing Technology

In my review from CES 2015 there were plenty of drones (with some medical applications) and technology to aid flying and use. Many were showing image stabilization as captured in my video here:

and I captured this on a custom video gimball

We have so much opportunity to innovate in healthcare by repurposing existing technology for DigitalHealth. This image stabilization technology has been applied to the task of eating which for most of us is easy but for some eating is a challenge of hand stabilization due to tremors:

You can buy these from Giftware (which was acquired by Google).

Parkinson is one of the leading causes of these tremors (about 1 Million americans are living with Parkinson’s and an estimated 7-10 Million worldwide). Its a simple idea (not to diminish the brilliant application and innovation by the founders) and a testament to the bright minds that fill our world and will continue to find solutions to problems we face in healthcare.

Join me at CES16

We’ve come a long way from CES in 1967

So I invite you to follow along for #CES16 my twitter handle (@DrNic1), my Instagram (DrNic1) account for pictures and Vine (DrNick) for insights, posts, pictures and short video segments of innovation throughout the course of the show

 

If you are here come join me and my fellow panel participants:
Shai Gozani, M.D., Ph.D., CEO and President, NeuroMetrix, Inc.
Beth Bierman, Partner, Morgan Lewis & Bockius
Bakul Patel, Associate Director for Digital Health, FDA, Center for Devices

Roadmap to FDA Approval: What You Need to Know
3:30-4:30 PM Tuesday, January 5
Las Vegas Convention Center, North Hall, N259

The discussion will be moderated by Alfred Poor, Editor, Health Tech Insider

and on Thursday the DigitalHealth Summit that will be in the Venetian, Level 4, Lando 4304

 

Memorable Healthcare from 2015

Memorable Healthcare from 2015

The New York Times pulled together a list of memorable stories from 2015 (Medical and Health News that Stuck with us here)
– The discovery that Ebola is not cured nor over
– The ongoing war against epidemics and debilitating and now potential treatable diseases
– Anxiety and stress increasing (or is it increasingly diagnosed) and little progress in treatment
– The ongoing Drug Nuclear arms race of blockbuster (and unaffordable) prices for new drugs
– valuing time with the clinician for discussion of end of life care
– the sorry state of mental health in this country pales into insignificance with the chain therapy in Africa
– Despite real progress in treating Type 1 Diabetes unnecessary limitations are still being placed on children

Its been an interesting year and we have made much (rapid) progress. These stories are just the tip of iceberg and next year expect many more and heres hoping for some real change to a broken healthcare system

Notable Medical Advances

Notable Medical Advances

Jerome Groopman’s highlights of medical advances form 2015: source
Coming at the bottom of his list but what continues to amaze me is the Placebo effect – well known in its effectiveness when offered without explanation but more surprisingly is that it is still effective even when the patient knows he is being given a placebo!
Other highlights include a new approach to cancer treatment that blocks its growth, the incredible insights emerging from our continued expansion of knowledge on the human genome (a different approach to cholesterol management)

We live in exciting times of innovation and medicine is benefiting greatly from advances in our understanding and science behind disease and the workings of our world and bodies

Healthy Living Starts with You

Human capital – the stock of knowledge, habits, social and personality attributes embodied in the ability to perform labor so as to produce economic value.

When reading the above definition of human capital, a particular word jumps out… habits. I am passionate about habits because poor lifestyle choices—or bad habits—are the number one driver of today’s health crisis. Chronic illnesses—such as heart disease, stroke, asthma, diabetes, and obesity—are responsible for 7 of 10 deaths each year, and treatment of chronic diseases accounts for 86% of U.S. healthcare costs. However, while they are among the most common and costly of health problems, chronic diseases are also the most preventable and manageable, because they often result from choices we make in our daily lives. To conquer chronic illness, we have to change our bad habits. And that’s not easy.

If I had to prescribe one medication to cure bad habits, it would be patient engagement. When we are effective at engaging patients to participate in their care, they begin to take more responsibility for their own health and adopt healthier habits. Effective engagement of chronic disease patients can lead to reductions in hospital visits, decreased morbidity and mortality and improvements in treatment adherence and quality of life.

To truly influence positive behavior changes, health goals must fit meaningfully in patients’ everyday lives. People must be surrounded by opportunities to embrace healthy lifestyles, and that requires the involvement of the entire community – care providers, governments, businesses, and of course, the people living there.

It’s no surprise that 7 of the top 10 Future-Ready cities overlap with the American Fitness Index’s list of healthiest U.S. cities. These developed cities are arguably some of the most connected and most educated, and they have infrastructure that supports recreational activity. But health is not only an outcome of development, it is a prerequisite for it, and never before have communities had such an incredible tool to engage people in making healthy lifestyle changes… technology.

Just as technology is giving providers more ways to care for and engage their patients in more places, it’s also providing the means for governments to reach constituents, businesses to tailor wellness programs for their workforce, and people to take charge of their own health.

Care providers

Technology gives caregivers unprecedented opportunity to engage patients and provide excellent care, anywhere, while also giving both patients and doctors a valuable feedback loop. Telehealth, remote biometric monitoring, and technology-assisted health coaching are powerful tools in the fight to improve chronic care outcomes because they provide in-the-moment support to patients struggling with diet, exercise habits, and medication routines.

BlueStarDiabetesAppFor example, an FDA-cleared mobile app that delivers real-time motivational messages, behavioral coaching and educational content right to the mobile devices of patients with Type II diabetes has demonstrated significant drops in their A1C levels.

Even simple text message programs can make a difference. Text2Breathe, a program of the Children’s National Medical Center, sends care information and reminders to parents of children with asthma and has helped help reduce emergency room visits.

State and local government

State and local government agencies have immense power to use technology to spearhead healthy lifestyle and disease prevention programs. For example, in response to Philadelphia’s high rates of chronic disease, city officials recently launched PhillyPowered, a multi-media campaign designed to encourage Philadelphians to become more physically active. The campaign features a mobile-friendly website, which lists free or low-cost places to get fit in the city, provides educational information, and includes a social media component that enables Philadelphians to share tips on how to fit exercise into their busy lives.

Portland University, in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Transportation, is piloting a smartphone app called ORcycle

designed to collect data and feedback about bicycle routes, infrastructure and accidents in order to improve infrastructure suitability for bicycling in Oregon.

Businesses suffer from the impact of chronic illness through absenteeism and retention problems, yet they are uniquely positioned to promote healthy lifestyles for workers and their families. Employers can work with their health plans to identify need for wellness programs and services such as preventive screenings, tailored to lowering both health risks and costs.

 

 

Companies are increasingly integrating technology into their wellness programs. For example, Dell’s Well at Dell program includes a virtual wellness portal that imports numbers from onsite health screenings and provides employees with an action plan, educational information, and email and text reminders to stay on track. Some companies are adopting wearable technology as part of their wellness programs to incent employees to get fit. It is worth noting that data security and privacy is paramount to protect employee health information and need to be designed in as part of all of these initiatives to maintain the trust that is essential for an effective healthcare system.

Technology today gives communities in all geographies the means to invest in the health of human capital and very real opportunities to shape the future of healthcare… now.

 

This article previously appeared on Future Ready Economies site

Doctors and Patients – Who Knows Best

Doctors and Patients – Who Knows Best

The Power of Knowledge

Life has changed and access to information is no longer the definition of value – we have seen these changes in the past as far back as 1494 when the printing press was introduced making books and knowledge more widely available:

Fear of the New Techno Panic TImeline

And proceeds through newspapers, the steam engine, photography and the death of painting, the telegraph, movies and the death of theaters, the telephone, phonograph, radio, television, computers and the internet and if anything the speed of change is accelerating. So too in medicine have things changed with a shift away from paternalistic experts to wide knowledge access and cooperative systems of healthcare delivery.

The Sorry State of Medicine

But the physician is still a key part of healthcare delivery and for many in the profession there is a sense of despondency and even despair with profession and their ability to deliver the care they aspire to deliver each and every day.  This recent piece in the Wall Street Journal Why Doctors Are Sick of Their Profession captured the spirit – only 6% of doctors surveyed describe their morale as positive and that’s not just bad for the doctors – its bad for patients too.

The sad part is we chose medicine because we thought it was worthwhile and noble, but from what I have seen in my short career, it is a charade

Running out of Time - Walking Gallery Jacket
Running out of Time – Walking Gallery Jacket

Physician suicide remains high with doctors the most likely to commit suicide with a rate of 1.87 times that of the average population (the US alone loses ~400 physicians to suicide per year) and their “success” measured as a completion rate is far higher than the general population (x 1.45.5).

 

As this piece The Painful Truth: Physicians Are Not Invincible highlighted (South Med J. 2000;93(10) ):

Physicians fulfill a special role within our society. While they are given many privileges and rewards, they also carry serious responsibilities. Physicians are expected to be healers, available to others whenever a crisis occurs or a medical need arises. They are expected to have unfailing expertise and competence, to be compassionate and concerned, and to provide universally successful care in a cost-effective manner. Such idealized expectations emanate from patients, from families, from society (including payers and regulatory and accreditation agencies), and from within the profession of medicine itself. Self-imposed expectations inhere in the institutions of medicine — medical colleges, clinics, hospitals, professional associations, and collegial relationships — and are internalized by students of medicine as they are socialized to become practicing professionals. These expectations become a part of how physicians define themselves.

So when I came across a picture of this mug:

Dont Confuse Google with Medical Degree

I posted it to my social media feed with a commentary

I wanted to highlight that clinicians are still an essential part of the healthcare system and their contributions are valued. This mug captured a strength of feeling that caught me by surprise.

It is available for purchase from a British eBay store and has been subject to several posts including this one from ePatient Dave – here and here and plenty of likes, dislikes, tweets, and even some fairly hefty criticism including one comment about starting a holy war.

Doctors Under Siege

I know many of my colleagues feel besieged. The system has drained every last ounce of empathy and compassion out of many with overhead requirements that detract from direct patient care and turn highly qualified, talented and well intentioned clinicians into data entry clerks and automatons. I have always believed and still do that every clinician gets up in the morning with all the best intentions to deliver high quality, compassionate car. There may be a small percentage of individuals who do not but  if they exist are a tiny minority.

We selected the career because we care. We selected the career because we want to offer support and compassion to our fellow human beings. We get our reward from these actions and there is no replacing the privilege of the trust that is placed in our hands in a personal and intimate relationship with our patients.

To get into medical school required an incredible climb up an academic mountain that was littered with others who did not make it. The experience tends to reinforce the sense of importance and verges on narcissism for some as the course and hurdles demand a level of self confidence in our own skills and knowledge. It is little wonder that what emerges from the medical school sausage machine can appear devoid of compassion, over confidant and unwelcoming of other opinions. It is any wonder that there is any compassion left by the time a doctor emerges with his degree and board certification – and that’s before he steps into a the healthcare quagmire and finds himself unprepared for healthcare as it is delivered today.

But many patients and patient advocates perceived this negatively and as an affront to their place in participatory care. The perception from patients appeared negative and there were multiple reports of patients who had been blocked when bringing information to their doctor and Dave even cites the sad instance in the UK  of the 19 year old girl who had fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (a rare cancer that with ~200 cases diagnosed worldwide annually) that was treated and then returned. Despite her pleadings to the contrary the Hospital and clinical team refused to believe her and told her to “stop googling”

There were even a few physicians who saw this mug negatively – as Bryan Vartabedian a pediatrician at Baylor  said:

and he posted this piece “Doctors and the Google Threat“. I don’t disagree with him that information access brings huge value and makes healthcare more accessible to a wider population but the systems in place don’t support the time aspect that this new sometimes unfiltered and unscientific data brings to many of the clinicians I talk to. One of the main challenges with this was captured by one friend who said:

You came in to see me with 9 minutes of reading material but I only have 7 minutes of time to care for you

And James Legan said:

And the deluge of information that arrives on everyone’s phone is replete with snake oil and pseudo science oftentimes amplified by celebrities who’s impact with their millions of followers can be incredibly damaging to individuals health.

Dave did take a constructive approach to the participation of patients

I personally am completely opposed to a patient going in and saying “I’ve decided I have condition X, and I want you to prescribe 42mg QID of medication Y.” I mean, have you ever seen the things medical students have to learn to get their license?? But I’m all in favor of a patient saying, “I have symptoms A and B, and from what I can tell from websites J and Q, that sounds like it could be M.” Explain your thinking, identify your source, and try to solve the diagnostic puzzle together: Collaborate.

While there are still doctors who see this as a challenge to the traditional model of care and the paternalistic distribution of knowledge and care, most do not.  I leave it with these two tweets that for me captured the underlying spirit I felt when I posted the original image:

and this one

Everyone on the Same Side

Most physicians say the best part of their jobs is taking care of people – its the human moments, the taking care of people that make our jobs so satisfying. We are all on the same side – the structure of  the  system forces behavior that is not always ideal but despite this physicians do want participatory interactions – we love patients, especially ones that are engaged in their own health and care and we do not (and cannot) know everything.

You may well bring information to us that we are not aware of or have not read or heard about and we hope there will be enough time and opportunity to review this and help include scientific knowledge, no matter the source, in our review and guidance on the best course of treatment for you.

The Incredible Progress in Medicine

Looking back at the history of medicine is fascinating (Victorian Medicine – from Fluke to Theory). Medicine was a combination of chance and quackery but over the course of the the last century has made incredible leaps. Science became an integral and training more formalized and increasingly specialized.

From Macbeth-like preparations of arsenic, iron or phosphorous to white coats and x-rays, the Victorian era witnessed a medical revolution

It is worth pausing and looking back to see the progress to date….likely small steps as we move forward at an incredible and accelerating pace this century

Our Remote Future in Healthcare

Its an exciting time to be in healthcare and medicine – technology is bringing so much innovation and opportunity to improve the delivery, quality and reduce the cost of healthcare. Much remains to be done

At our our recent DellWorld conference we captured insights into this exciting future

As Dr. Jai Menon vice president and chief research officer for Dell Research Data said data may well be the oil of the 21st Century and in healthcare this is especially true as we see an explosion of insights and data into our health, clinical status, genome, biome and beyond

We finished sequencing the first human genome in 2003

and things have only accelerated from there with sequencing now taking less than 24 hours and costing less than $1,000

Just this one area is going to add huge amounts of data that needs to be turned into knowledge as I shared in this presentation to the Austin Healthcare Thinktank Roundtable


But even before we get to that point there are so many opportunities emerging into our daily lives to improve the service and the healthcare delivery system. Telehealth or Telemedicine is a clear winner and the regulatory and reimbursement systems seem to be catching up (details in this presentation form Connected Health).

Integrating the data and providing intelligence and insights from the mass of data that is sweeping over healthcare will be important but as we gather more our understanding improves expect this area to accelerate with deeper more meaningful insights tied closely to the ability to integrate the data from multiple (and importantly non-traditional sources).

To get a sense of the opportunities and changes coming watch the video compilation form the conference below:

 

Its a great time to be in healthcare as we open new doors to knowledge with the data

Why All Doctors Should be on Twitter

Why All Doctors Should be on Twitter

The title on the article is actually “Why all Retina Doctors Should be on Twitter” – but i think should read all doctors source
Social media is an open forum for learning, sharing and engagement and is where the patients. It offers a concise (140 characters or less) which helps with speed and especially useful for busy people like doctors
It comes with a great infographic and listing of the basic jargon on twitter that would help anyone just entering this space
Time to get on board – here’s a pathway

DellWorld and Healthcare Disruption

Back in 1985 the world was introduced to the Doc and Marty McFly in the iconic movie “Back to the Future” which as followed by 2 sequels – we were treated to a trip into the future that took us to

BacktotheFuture

October 26, 2015 at 4:29 as you can see from this clip from the second movie

Universal pictures is clearly enjoying the fun to and released this teaser

In a stroke of genius Dell planned their DellWorld event to coincide with this – hence the Time Machine on the Show Floor

DeloreanDellWorld and we put together a video honoring Back to the Future Day

We have been enjoying a trip to remind ourselves how far we have come

So we do have self tying shoes – Nike Air Mags

And this video is close enough for a Hoverboard from this Canadian Inventor

We have seen huge progress in innovation especially in healthcare and at Dell World I am showing off devices from a range of players in the space doing some interesting and unusual things:

 

Muse – The Brain Sensing Headband

 – I’ve been experimenting with this for the past few days. Incredible insights into how active our brains are and offering a way to calm and relax. Especially useful if you are like me and struggle to focus on any form of relation with your mind wandering. It senses your brain waves using a series of electrodes positioned at the front of the band and then links to your phone and the accompanying app that provides exercises using feedback to help you focus and improve your focus and ability to relax

I’m still new but in a few days I have already noticed a small improvement in my ability to focus and relax for slightly longer periods. I will be reporting back on experiences on this

 

MDMouse – Measuring your Blood Pressure with your Mouse

I was intrigued by the idea of measuring my blood pressure on a more regular basis by incorporating technology into a sensor into a commonly used interface device

The unit has a fold out cuff that you insert your finger into and accompanying software will use this to measure your blood pressure on demand. As we have seen with other devices making the process as easy as possible improves use and compliance and this adds more granularity to blood pressure readings and trends. I’m expecting this to show some improvement based ont he effects of the other activites.

HexoSkin – The Smart Shirt

Intelligent fabrics are coming to a fashion store near you and soon and Hexoskin is one of the early examples.

Amongst the metrics a real time ECG

But there is so much more and power of this is as much about the accompanying application and the deep insights into training regime that is customized to you, your body and current fitness levels. I’m going to start down the path with this – measuring my VO2 Max and then start a program to see how much I can improve on this.

 

FitBit Surge – GPS Tracking Watch

Fitbit have been in the wearable monitoring space for some time (founded in 2007) and I personally have owned a wide range of their devices. The latest – the Surge offers GPS tracking with heart rate tracking in a battery efficient package

Early days for my journey but again expecting to use the interaction alongside others to help customize training and keep myself motivated – especially while on the road

 

Spire – Mental and Physical Health Improvements

Based on a simple “Stone” that clips to the inside of your belt or bra and tracks your breathing as the basis of its feedback. It comes with a charging plate – no need to plug the device in to charge

Simple design but packs an interesting punch that keeps offering feedback via your Bluetooth linked phone and Spire App. An interesting (and useful discovery) – it is waterproof! For those looking for simplicity this may well be a great match and I will be comparing the interactions and results over the coming weeks

 

 

Then finally two more targeted solutions

 

uBiome – Exploring Your MicroBiome

We are made up of much more than our own cells and in fact there are 10 microbes for every 1 human cell. Increasing amount of science suggests this is a big contributor to our health status but until recently we have been unable to assess it. This kit changes that offering

I have not had a chance to gather samples but will be doing so in the next few weeks to explore this new frontier in medicine and understanding of our bodies and health and wellness

 

 

SmartVision Labs – The Smart Phone Vision Exam

In this innovative smartphone based tool – offering vision exams using an iPhone and an attachment

Like the other iPhone attachments this device stands to open up access to the millions of people in the world who walk around with uncorrected vision – this is the first step in letting people see

 

 

Finally

And a special shout out to the 88pmh investment house in Africa (@88mph_Africa) – who have invested in 36 companies between 2011 – 2014 in Kenya and South Africa and as Ashish Thakkar puts it: The Lion has Awoken and this powerhouse of innovation is creating some incredible technology – watch this space

 

 

Healthcare Disruption – DigitalHealth

I presented to the Healthcare Thinktank in Austin on October 15 a presentation titles: Healthcare disruption

This was the outline:

Gartner ranked Dell the #1 worldwide IT services provider in healthcare in 2014. Dell sees global disruptions in healthcare delivery and continues to invest in strategies to address these rapid changes. They are actively enhancing development, implementation and adoption of novel technologies, services, and applications that will revolutionize information-driven care, resulting in improved patient outcomes and overall cost savings worldwide. Dr. Nick is responsible for providing strategic insight and will discuss some Dell’s strategies to achieve an IT environment that is interconnected, efficient and patient-focused.

I talked about the high level trends

  • Consumer Empowerment
  • Automation
  • Connected Health
  • Population Data
  • Big Data
  • Healthcare IT

and the impact of the consumers taking charge and how this will impact our future and took a look at the exciting future in healthcare that will include

  • Applied and Predictive Analytics
  • Telehealth
  • Secure Healthcare Cloud
  • Clinical Archives
  • Patient Engagement and how Social Media, Analytics and Mobile Clinical Computing are going to be important to enable this
  • Wearables and Internet of Things
  • Genomics and Precision Medicine and the impact this will have on data storage and archiving for healthcare facilities
  • and of course – Security

You can see my slides here

 

Calling Doctor Data

With a nod to Star Trek, Bones, Data and even the Holo Doctor

Much of medical practice is as much a mystery to doctors as it is to patients.

Human physiology is so complex, and the external variables so numerous, that we often have no sure knowledge of why one patient did well or another patient didn’t. Every physician longs for some way to really know what will work for each patient.

While we have come a long way, even in just the past five years, there is still so much left to be learned. The one thing that can help us reach greater knowledge faster is data and analytics.
That’s really the underlying value of electronic medical records: they represent a treasure trove of data waiting to be mined. With the right algorithms, we can use that data to find patterns that tell us what factors make a tangible difference in outcomes. It’s the wisdom of the ages waiting to be read.

Perhaps the most valuable medical team member of the future will be a data scientist. These are the experts who understand how to tag and mine data and how to construct algorithms that find patterns accurately and can help us be more effective in delivering the best possible care every time.

For example, there is a great study from the University of Iowa Medical Center, in which gastroenterology surgeons are using real-time patient data in the operating room, combined with past data from gastric surgery patients, to predict who is at risk for developing a surgical site infection. This helps guide decisions in the OR as well as post-surgical care. While doctors know that a variety of modalities can reduce infection risk and promote healing, resources are not endless. By identifying patients who need high-level care, they can ensure that resources are targeted where they are needed most. The project has reduced surgical site infections by more than 50 percent in the gastroenterology patients whose care was guided by the analytics.

So Dr. Data (as New York Times writer Steve Lohr calls one data scientist) is saving lives, even without a medical degree.

 

How do we know the predictions are accurate?

But here’s the catch: we’ve got to get the algorithms right. If we aren’t careful, we can draw conclusions that aren’t really there. To make giant leaps forward in understanding, we need a colleague on the case who really understands how to create algorithms that have practical value and accurate results.

Tom Hill, a colleague of mine at Dell, recently wrote a blog in which he noted the necessity of using a systematic, transparent approach to predictive analytics. “Harvesting big data carries with it the responsibility to do-the-right-thing with those data. Big or any data and predictive models in healthcare must be correct, access and tamper-proof (secure), must not discriminate, generally do-good, and not-do-any-harm.”

He goes on to talk about the need for transparency in analytics, so that those using the results understand what data is being used and how it is being analyzed. As changes or improvements are made, they must be documented, so that the transparency lives on.

I think this is a critical point for physicians who will be using the algorithms in the future. If our patients’ lives will depend on the quality of the analytics used to guide treatment decisions, we need to know that the algorithms are correct. We don’t want a black box that dispenses treatment prescriptions; instead, we want to know how the results are created, so that we can trust the advice offered and help guide future improvements.

Adopting analytics in ways that don’t risk lives

Dr. Hill’s point about “not doing harm” is well taken. As healthcare organizations add analytics to patient care, projects like the one at the University of Iowa is a good place to start. It takes a body of existing knowledge about a large population of gastroenterology surgical patients and analyzes what factors were associated with certain outcomes. It then takes that analysis and compares it to a specific patient, providing insight into how that patient may do in post-surgical care.


The likelihood of a result that harms a patient is small. At worst, a patient might receive more care than is really necessary, or might not be recommended for care that would help. But that happens all the time without any analytics intervention, so the risk to patients is not increased by using the insights from the analytics. And the care team can monitor to see that, if the patient needs more extensive post-surgical care, that care can be ordered.
Other initial analytics projects in healthcare are looking at ways to predict surges in demand for care, based on environmental factors, and those projects also aren’t likely to put patients in harm’s way.

These kinds of project allow an organization to use analytics for practical improvements, while also learning how to use these new insights. As the organization’s expertise grows, the complexity of the analytics projects will likely grow, too. But starting with a project of limited scope and low risk for patient harm is a smart idea.
It’s also a way to help build trust. Physicians may be somewhat leery of trusting an analytics program to help them make treatment decisions, especially if a recommendation flies in the face of what that doctor’s always done in the past. So institutions must be careful to build trust in analytics as they move forward. As physicians see the effectiveness of using these tools, they’ll be more willing to engage in analytics themselves. So how, when and why you use analytics really matters. And making sure that you’re working with a really good Dr. Data is important, because at least for the foreseeable future, medical practitioners will be working very closely with Dr. Data to make analytics a powerful force for good.

 

This piece originally appeared in Beckers Hospital Review: Calling Dr. Data: A new consultant is set to make medical care more effective